VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Are you eating enough fruits and vegetables? Maybe not. The current dietary guidelines recommend that most adults should eat a minimum of 1.5 to 2 cups of fruit along with 2 to 3 cups of vegetables per day. Eating enough fruits and vegetables and taking the vitamins, minerals, phytochemical, and antioxidants in them will work to reduce your risks such as heart diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity and even some cancers.

(Source: Men’s Health)

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Find your cooking inspiration at https://www.instagram.com/seasonsupply_/

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

We have an instagram page and show easy ways to cook vegetables every day? Check https://www.instagram.com/seasonsupply_/ !


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Purple Sprouting Broccoli is a spring favourite. It's in season February to April and is a welcome relief from all the root vegetables during the hungry gap. It won't last long once picked, as it ages its sweet earthy taste is replaced by a slightly cabbagey favour. It's best eaten as soon as you get it home (who could resist anyway?). If you absolutely must store it - keep it in an airtight bag in the fridge.

Purple Sprouting Broccoli´s high vitamin C content makes it a great accompaniment to high iron foods such as shellfish, quinoa, red meat and legumes. Vitamin C aids the absorption of iron which is vital for making new red blood cells.

It doesn't need much to make the flavours soar!  It's spectacular slightly charred on the griddle with a little olive oil, lemon and a sprinkle of flakey sea salt. That said, it can also stand up to the robust flavors in stir fries or when paired with red meats such as lamb.

Looking for more ways to cook Purple Sprouting Broccoli? Visit Cookpad.com

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

We have an instagram page and show easy ways to cook vegetables every day? Check https://www.instagram.com/seasonsupply_/ !


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

You can freeze or cancel your subscription any time. To freeze your subscription for the following week, simply email the word FREEZE to seasonsupply@cookpad.com, using the subject FREEZE. The deadline is before 3pm the Friday before delivery.


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

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VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

3 things you don’t know about purple sprouting broccoli

(1) This is at its the best between February and April.

(2) This has great flavour and nutritious - a single portion provides half your daily requirement of carotenoids and high levels of folic acid and vitamins A and C.

(3) This was initially cultivated by the Romans. Marcus Gavius Apicius, one of the creators of the earliest known recipe books, said “Prepare them with a mix of cumin and coriander seeds, chopped onion, a few drops of oil and sun-made wine”


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

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VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Did you know that vegetables lose their optimal nutritional value as soon as they are picked? 

Your local farmer delivers within 24 hours of harvest for the best quality, 7-10 days faster than a typical grocery store. Often times, produce is picked in the morning and delivered straight to your office in a day. 

With SeasonSupply, you add more nutrient-dense food to plates every week. 


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Love ‘em or think you hate ‘em, Brussels sprouts are at their best right now - during the coolest part of the year. Many people have had bad experiences with sprouts which have been boiled to oblivion - this makes them turn to mush and releases the “sulfur” smell. Honestly, that would be enough to put anyone off! But cooked properly, they’re sweet, nutty and delicious.


The mantra for cooking sprouts is “less is more” - they cook fast and once they’re overdone, they’re spoiled. Don’t bother boiling them, they’re best halved then fried or roasted. Pairings such as chestnut, pancetta or tangy fruits work well.


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

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VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Though UK beetroot is available most of the year, they’re at their best from June to October.

The leaves continue to draw out nutrients, even after they’ve been picked and will wilt quickly. If you come across a beet with fresh greens attached, it’s the ultimate indicator of freshness. It’s a sign they were picked recently and are packed with even more nutrients.

Remove the leaves before storing to keep the root fresher for longer, but don’t throw them away. They’re great for bone health as they’re packed with vitamin C, silica and calcium.

Beets are famous for their vivid colouring, but don’t worry about staining your hands while preparing beetroot, you can rub some lemon juice over them to help remove the colour.

Cooking with beetroot

Beetroot isn’t just great for savoury dishes, it can be used to make delectable sweets too! It’s often added to chocolate cakes and brownies to give them added moisture and richness. Try this chocolate beetroot cake recipe or these pink Valentine’s pancakes.


Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Onions are a staple vegetable all over the world. They’re the key ingredient in everything from French onion soup to Indian bhajis. They come in a huge array of colours, shapes and sizes. No matter how they look, they’ll help keep you on the ball. They’re rich in vitamin B6 and manganese - both of which are needed for healthy brain function.

They’re best stored in a cool dark place with plenty of ventilation. Don’t put them in the fridge, the cold temperature will make the flesh go soft.

Cut onions without shedding a tear:

  • Chill the onion first

  • Use your sharpest knife

  • Switch on the extractor fan

  • Keep exposed cuts against the chopping board

Are you looking for recipes? Find them at Cookpad.com!

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VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Leeks are a key ingredient in many cuisines all over the world. Here are just a few of the dishes to which leeks are integral.

Turkey

Zeytinyagli Pirasa is a typical Turkish dish -  a simple combination of leeks, carrots and rice with plenty of olive oil. Leeks are so embedded in Turkish food culture that they’ve become a part of the language. There’s a common phrase amongst Turco-Albanians when they’re full after a meal, “I couldn’t eat anymore, even if offered a leek”.

France

A typical French dish is Leeks Vinaigrette, whole leeks boiled and marinated in a Dijon sauce. Flamiche, a creamy leek tart, is very popular too.

Spain

The Spanish have their take too! Leeks are a popular addition to a the Spanish tortilla. For an English twist on the classic Catalonian calçot (flame charred green onions), roast baby leeks whole, then smother with Romesco sauce.

Interested in more leek recipes? Find one on Cookpad

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Leeks are a key ingredient in many cuisines all over the world. Here are just a few of the dishes to which leeks are integral.

Turkey

Zeytinyagli Pirasa is a typical Turkish dish -  a simple combination of leeks, carrots and rice with plenty of olive oil. Leeks are so embedded in Turkish food culture that they’ve become a part of the language. There’s a common phrase amongst Turco-Albanians when they’re full after a meal, “I couldn’t eat anymore, even if offered a leek”.

France

A typical French dish is Leeks Vinaigrette, whole leeks boiled and marinated in a Dijon sauce. Flamiche, a creamy leek tart, is very popular too.

Spain

The Spanish have their take too! Leeks are a popular addition to a the Spanish tortilla. For an English twist on the classic Catalonian calçot (flame charred green onions), roast baby leeks whole, then smother with Romesco sauce.

Interested in more leek recipes? Find one on Cookpad

Recipes to try this week

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Have you been lucky enough to try Eyal Shani’s famous roasted cauliflower? It’s been a signature dish at his Tel Aviv restaurant for the past 10 years.

His no-fuss recipe relies on great quality ingredients and allows their natural flavours to shine through. The dish has been mimicked by other celebrity chefs including Jamie Oliver and, most recently, Rachael Ray.

If you’d like to have a go, the recipe couldn’t be simpler!

1) Preheat the oven to 200C. Choose a small to medium-sized cauliflower. They have a sweeter flavour.

2) Simmer whole in salted water until just tender, then drain.

3) Drizzle with good quality olive oil and massage into the florets to ensure even coverage.

4) Roast the cauliflower in the preheated oven for 30 minutes, until the top turns a beautiful golden brown.

5) Serve immediately.

Interested in more cauliflower recipes? Find one on Cookpad

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VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 
IMG_4824.jpg



BOX DELIVERIES WILL RESUME ON JANUARY 9TH!

Did you know?

While carrots are a year-round supermarket staple, they’re not in season all the time. Each year there’ll be a spring and an autumn harvest. Part of the later harvest will go into cold storage for winter, which means you can enjoy UK carrots for months to come.

SeasonSupply members will already know just how delicious fresh carrots can be. Jamie Oliver shared an easy way to make them even tastier. This recipe makes a great addition to any festive spread.

Caramelised Christmas carrots:

  1. Peel and chop carrots into pieces roughly the size of your thumb.

  2. In a pan, gently fry a crushed garlic clove in a knob of butter.

  3. Add a splash of clementine juice, vinegar and water. Reduce slightly.  

  4. While the glaze is still runny, add the carrots into the pan along with a sprinkle of sea salt, black pepper and thyme.

  5. Stir, cover and cook on low for 15-20 minutes until tender.

  6. Remove the lid and reduce until sticky and caramelised.

Interested in more carrot recipes? Find one on Cookpad.com


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VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Swede is in season from October to February and is a popular holiday veg. Most people struggle to tell the difference between a swede and a turnip. They’re very similar, although a swede is a little sweeter and less watery. In fact, the name is simply an abbreviation of Swedish turnip.

Cook it as you would any other root vegetable: roast it, mash it, fry it or put it in a gratin. Mashed swede with cream, called neeps in Scotland, is a traditional Scottish side-dish served with haggis on Burns night.

Interested in more swede recipes? Find one on Cookpad

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COOKED BY MEMBERS

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Many of you may not have tried celeriac before. Raw celeriac is not common on supermarket shelves. This is a shame as is grows well in the UK climate and is a delicious addition to everything from roast dinners to salads.

Celeriac could not be easier to use. Our farmer’s favourite way to ‘cook’ celeriac is to grate it into a salad or make a garlicky celeriac gratin. Just slice it and use it as you would potato in any gratin or dauphinois recipe.

Celebrity Chef, Jamie Oliver, is a fan too. He said, “All you need to make celeriac really special is a little olive oil and some lovely herbs. You can treat celeriac like any root vegetable - roast it, boil it or mash it as you would potatoes.”

Interested in more celeriac recipes? Find one on Cookpad

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COOKED BY MEMBERS

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?

Would you be interested in upgrading your cooking skills?

Here is the tip to cook leeks better. Check what the world's best restaurant, NOMA, says:

There are many ways to cook leeks. You might often roast or sauté them. The dish at Noma is deceptively simple: they grill leeks for 45 minutes with olive oils over hardwood lump charcoal until the outer layers were burnt and inside gets soft.

The effect of the grilling is incredible - the richness of the leeks. You can use grill pans to make at home or barbecue them.

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Cooked by members

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

Did you know?


Butternut squash is one of the joys of the fall but peeling is not a great experience. Check the tips for hassle-free peeling:
Step 1: poke holes in the squash using a fork
Step 2: slice the top and bottom off the squash
Step 3: put the squash in microwave for 4 minutes
Step 4: let the squash cool slightly and then peel the skin using a vegetable peeler or knife 

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COOKED BY MEMBERS

VEGETABLES THIS WEEK

 

DID YOU KNOW?

Back in the day, beets were a medicine because of the healing powers and potency. They have made a ‘come back’ in the last few years and is used in a juice or as part of a smoothie!

Though beetroots are available year around, they are sweetest and most tender from June to October. Fresh beets can be stored in the fridge for two to four weeks. If you would like to store them longer, we recommend to remove greens attached.

If you worry that your hands become stained during cooking beetroot, rub some lemon juice over them to help remove the colour.

Recipes to try this week

Cooked by members